Skip to content

Blog

Pivoting Your Career

I recently found myself in the uncomfortable position of having to look for a new job. Thanks to the ‘alleged’ poor life decisions of a certain former leadership person, the company I had poured most of the last four years into was closing its doors. We’d limped along best we could for a time after the ‘event’, but it was not to be. It was time to put it out of its misery. Those of us that had survived that long suddenly found ourselves with a need to go job hunting.

Embrace Failure

For all of us, there will times, many times, when our efforts end in failure. Sometimes, they will be small failures. And sometimes, they will be spectacular failures. Sometimes, you will be at fault. And sometimes, despite all your best efforts, someone else will be at fault. It doesn’t matter. It’s just another opportunity.

My Advice: Finding a Developer Job

It’s a great time to be in the tech industry in general. Unemployment is down in most areas in the tech sector. You have the advantage. Use it. As with all things, times change. There were times it wasn’t good to be in tech. Those times will likely come again. But for now, you’ve got it good. If you’re not happy where you’re at right now, do something about it. Go and find a new job.

My Favorite Podcasts for 2018

It’s been nearly a year since I listed my favorite podcasts and it’s time for an update. So here’s my favorite podcasts for 2018. There have been a few additions and subtractions. The rest of the list (which I won’t repeat here) remains the same.

Take Time to Breathe – A Few Minutes to Better Code

In a previous blog post, I talked about taking time to unplug in order to avoid burnout. That’s not what this is about. This is about getting in the zone. It’s about those times when you are so deep into the code that you just keep going and going. This is about those times when you get an idea and you dive headlong in and don’t come up for air for hours. Stop it. Stop it right now. Take a step back. Take a moment to breathe.

Devs: Are you giving back, or only taking?

A couple of weeks ago I attended my favorite annual developers’ conference: Stir Trek. The reasons I like Stir Trek are many. It’s a fantastically run conference. It’s entirely a volunteer, non-profit effort. Over its history I have only missed two Stir Trek events. This year, as the time for Stir Trek registration approached, I made a decision. I was going to attend, as usual. This time I intended to do something more. The dev community has been good time. I thought it time to give back more.

The Problem with StackOverflow/StackExchange

The StackExchange sites are a collection of websites on various topics where people can ask questions and get answers from members of that community. People can also up-vote or down-vote both the questions and the answers, as well as add comments regarding either. People receive ranking points, called ‘reputation’, for asking questions and on how many up-votes/down-votes their questions and answers receive. It’s intended to drive an active (and interactive) community of people around each subject area. The first and most popular of the sites is StackOverflow.

The Mysterious Vanishing Hard Drive

I was having an issue with the main PC that we use at home. Over the last couple of months, from time to time, one of us wouldn’t be able to log in. It was the famous infamous Windows 10 black screen. When they logged in, a cursor would appear over a black background and then nothing else.

“Visual Studio debugging – SSL Connection / Connection Reset with IISExpress – Stack Overflow

Sometimes it can be a huge pain in the rear to work with SSL on local IIS or IIS Express in Visual Studio. I was trying to debug an issue with my authentication flow and just could not get my auth server to run locally. I finally came across this StackOverflow answer and discovered that I was running into the issue where my port for IIS Express was something like 66234. I didn’t know that to get it to work right, you have set the port between 44300 and 44398. And like Jason’s answer, absolutely nothing I could see either during setup or runtime told me that.