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Microsoft Flow: Converting Feed Categories to Hashtags

In a number of previous posts starting with this one, I’ve covered ways to use Microsoft Flow to post to to your Twitter and LinkedIn feeds when you publish a blog post. One thing I haven’t covered in those posts is doing something with your categories. This time, we’ll walk through adding steps to our flow to convert the categories from our blog post into hashtags for our Twitter and LinkedIn posts.

UPDATE: Microsoft Flow: Posting to LinkedIn

In a previous post, I showed how to post to LinkedIn about a blog post. The connector available at that time used V1 of the LinkedIn API. That version no longer works. Thankfully, Flow already has added support for the LinkedIn V2 API, and it’s a simple swap of steps to replace V2 for V1.

Microsoft Flow: Feeding Forms data to Dynamics 365 CRM

One of the most universal pieces of any company website is the ‘Contact Us’ page. There are countless ways this is handled. At the simplest it can just open a mailto link. Sometimes there’s an inline form of some sort that feeds into some app somewhere. A lot of times it will require someone along the process to take the data from that form and copy/paste it into the whatever Customer Relationship Management system the company uses.

The True Costs of a Startup Failing

I read an article in Fortune magazine’s online site this week titled ‘What Happens When a Startup Goes Bust’. The article focused on vendors who don’t get paid when startup fails. It gives examples of several small businesses owed various amounts of money in the wake of Bay area food delivery startup Munchery failing. And while the article is interesting in its take on vendors losing out on payments and how venture capital firms should have more accountability, it doesn’t even give a single mention to those who end up getting screwed the most when a startup fails: the employees of the startup.

Microsoft Flow for Expiration Dates pt. 2

In the previous Flow post, I walked through using Flow to set up reminders for things you need to keep track of, like expiration dates, renewal dates and so forth. In this follow up, I’ll walk through creating a weekly process that emails you a list of ¬†upcoming reminders so you know what’s coming in the future.

Microsoft Flow For Expiration Dates

We all have a near endless list of expiration and reminder dates to keep track of: software renewals, contracts, driver’s license, certifications, warranties, and on and on. Or maybe we want a better way of seeing when that pesky doctor or vet appointment is without scrolling endlessly through our calendar.

Developer Stockholm Syndrome

Developers seem to have an irrational love/hate relationship with programming languages. We tend to love the languages we use on a regular basis. And we seem to hate languages we don’t or no longer use. I’ve come to refer to this as Developer Stockholm Syndrome.

Microsoft Flow – Adding Some Delay

In a previous post, I walked through saving tweets to an Azure table so they could be retweeted later with an #ICYMI tag. As with most processes of learning, we do the hard way first to learn the concepts. And then we learn the easier ways to do it. As it so happens, Flow provides a much easier way to do this. We’re going to add some delay.

Flow & Function Together – CS Advent

For this year’s CS Advent post, I am going to continue my posts about using Microsoft Flow to make our lives easier. This time, we’re adding in some Azure Functions as well. In a previous post, I covered creating a Flow that an attendee to a conference might create to watch for tweets that they might want to re-tweet. This time, we want to take on the role of conference organizers who want to watch the flow of tweets for how positive or negative people feel about our conference.